Telephone: 01.46.34.85.73
8 Rue Casimir-Delavigne, 75006 Paris

Secondhand Books
In English.

Store Hours:

Monday - Saturday 11h-20h
Sunday 14h-19h
For selling your books:
Monday 16h-20h
Tuesday - Saturday 11h-16h

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Good books bought, sold, and exchanged.

Literature, criticism, history, philosophy, religion, poetry, literary journals, cookbooks and children's books.

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"I've been dropping into Berkeley Books for several years now, after discovering it accidentally in the 6th Arrondissement. Once you get inside the bookshop, this process of accidental discovery goes on, because this is one of the last remaining bookshops on the planet where creative chaos reigns. That, and a broad spread of American and British books makes Berkeley one of the final hunting grounds for literary book lovers anywhere. Forget browsing, scrolling, burning and scanning. Serendipity can only be experienced in a place like Berkeley . . ."

James McCabe, Augsburg Germany

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"You've got books that we can't get at home anymore."

A visitor from Charlottesville, Virginia

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"This is a fascinating shop."

A visitor from London

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"You've got a great selection of books for people who think and read."

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"You meet interesting people in this place."

Jane from Calais

Latest News: We've rebuilt our website, please let us know what you think here.

Welcome to Our Website
Information about our shop.

If you have good books to sell or exchange, please bring them in between the hours of 11am and 4pm Tuesday through Saturday, or between 4pm and 8pm on Monday.

 

What's New?
Poem of the Day

THEY ARE TRACKING DOWN EVERYTHING PICTURESQUE

they are tracking down everything picturesque

gentlemen came with portfolios and measuring rods
they measured the ground spread out their papers
workers shooed away the pigeons
ripped up the fence tore down the house
mixed lime in the garden
brought cement raised scaffolding
they are going to build an enormous apartment house

they are wrecking the beautiful houses one by one
the houses which nourished us since we were small
with their wide windows their wooden stairs
with their high ceilings lamps on the walls
trophies of folk architecture

they are tracking down everything picturesque
chasing it away persistently to the upper part of town
it expires like a revolution betrayed
in a little while it will not even exist in post cards
nor in the memory or souls of our children

Dinos Christianopoulos (1931-)
Translated from the Greek
by Kimon Friar